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English 42
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
south asia correspondent julie mccarthy, who's reporting this story from delhi. jns julie, there are tens of thousands of rapes in end yabs, there are 40,000 rape cases currently-- currently in the courts. why has this case caught the national imagination? >> wbltion i think what cause the imagination of the people was this horrendous attack on this young woman that is 23-year-old girl who was-- who is at the heart of this upheaval in india. after the shock subsided there was anger and it poured out into the streets. so you had a very graphic symbol around which people rallied. and the protests in many ways were spontaneous. they were driven by the it revolution that is india. social media played a huge role in assembling people, getting out the message, what were they doing, where were they doing it. and prot testers were demanding sus 'tis for this young woman who they said was gang raped on a moving bus that passed through police check pointses that assault was taking place. so there was dismay of the police who had long been criticized on their infectioniveness on hand
south asia correspondent julie mccarthy, who's reporting this story from delhi. jns julie there are tens of thousands of rapes in end yabs, there are 40,000 rape cases currently-- currently in the courts. why has this case caught the national imagination? >> wbltion i think what cause the imagination of the people was this horrendous attack on this young woman that is 23-year-old girl who was-- who is at the heart of this upheaval in india. after the shock subsided there was anger and it poured out into the streets. so you had a very graphic symbol around which people rallied. and the protests in many ways were spontaneous. they were driven by the it revolution that is india. social media played a huge role in assembling people, getting out the message, what were they doing, where were they doing it. and prot testers were demanding sus 'tis for this young woman who they said was gang raped on a moving bus that passed through police check pointses that assault was taking place. so there was dismay of the police who had long been criticized on their infectioniveness on handling violent cri
in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year? >> one of the best charts is the vix being high. it was a time to buy. in chicago that's a famous saying. when the vix is high it's time to buy. >> we high enough yet? >> not yet, not yet. got the fiscal cliff issues which you've talked about a lot here. >> yes, we have. >> jobs coming out on friday. morgan stanley looking for 185,000. basically the housing market, you had the case schiller numbers today. it
with those marines. he took leave the first of july and secretly married theresa. july 10 was the last time i saw him. he arrived in afghanistan the end of july and wrote these final words in his journal on august 2. mom, dad, i can never repay you for all you have done for me. you made me into the man i am today. i hope that i have made you proud. that has always been my goal. i love you both so much. tell the girls i love them and couldn't be prouder older brother. i have always tried to be an honorable man and i truly believe in what we are doing here. i am doing this for my family so that they need not fear. my country so that can be a beacon of light for the entire world. the men around me because no one could ask for it better company than the u.s. armed forces and finally, i do this for myself so that i might know the measure of myself and in and not be found wanting. i believe that it is my duty to fight and having done all that i can to simply stand against this and all the evil work that is upon this earth. he called me on the fifth and said, the people are so nice and the kids are
on july the 25th the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal, as i said at that time, was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster and that democrats were really serious they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house, as the constitution requires, and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called senate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes, but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here, and as i said this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that havin
, this is a photograph of dory here at heart mountain and he was taken either in july 1943 or july 1944. we can't be sure which. its daytime. nothing suspicious about it, not the surreptitious about it in the barracks and background ec takes place in an open, public space within the residential area of the camp itself. just check this image. so there's something else that's special about this image. it's in color. brilliant, beautiful color. take this photograph of the same event at heart mountain taken up by government photographer, but one of the internees in camp. just checked out of. look at that, the color restored. by taking color photographs and remove the color so you can see them the way we are accustomed to seeing this area and in the weekly for shot by the photographer. i want to take a moment and ask you what the impact is right up to your couple comments. what is the impact of seeing this historical moment in color rather than in black-and-white? could a couple of you put into words what the difference might need of seeing it in color as opposed to black-and-white? >> when i saw the colors,
a bill exactly like this sitting in the united states senate. harry reid passed it back in july, and republicans refused to vote on it. boehner, why don't you vote on that? the time for complaining about this deal, totally over. >> nobody can get 100% of what they want, and this is not simply a contest between parties in terms of who looks good and who doesn't. >> don't you think republicans need to be careful about pushing back on this for the good of the country? if no deal is struck this year, president obama, what does he have? well, he's got the inauguration coming up. a big platform. he's got the state of the union address coming up. a big platform. he is going to have a better chance to have the american people on his side. president obama urged all members of congress to get some perspective over the holiday weekend on this. >> everybody can cool off. everybody can drink some eggnog, have some christmas cookies, sing some christmas carols, enjoy the company of loved ones, and then i'd ask every member of congress while they're back home to think about that. think about t
that it did. i was not on that trip, so i do not know specifically. i also visited libya in july. i also visited in september after the attack in benghazi. i can speak to my own experience. secretary clinton has said, all those of us as senior leaders are responsible for what is happening. i certainly hold myself accountable. i certainly had a lot of time to think about sharper questions i could have cost, sharper focus i could have provided. >> on your visit in july,, or september, the debt issue and specific come up? the folks on the ground say, we're worried about what has happened was security? >> no, there's no specific discussion about it. i did talk to ambassador stevens in general terms. in march of 2012? >> i am certain it did. we certainly emphasize the importance of not only improve in the security capabilities of the libyan interim government at that time. we offered a number of programs to help them build those institutions which are made one of the greatest weaknesses of the libyan it from government. -- interim government. >> your pretty sure that the issue came up, you ju
not remember them in any of the pictures. it was julie, david, and my parents walking them out. my dad came into the oval office with they had moved us children. you could just see this sadness. it was almost as if you had been to a funeral and there was a death. you did not know what to say. it was a very awkward moment of what do you say. we came together as a family knowing we were headed up to the east room where he would be sworn in, which of course was a very joyous moment to see your father, but what a sad moment for the american people. >> the question that i think probably everyone secretly asks themselves when they meet you is what is it like to grow up in the white house? a kid's perspective on a day-to- day living standpoint. what are your rooms like? >> first thing is it became my room. i wanted to know who else had been in my room. [laughter] so i asked the curator. he said, well, i can't think of anybody famous. [laughter] and so, then, i asked president eisenhower. who slept in this room when you were here? he said i think queen elisabeth lady in waiting was there. [laughter
experience. i've also visited libya -- >> in july? >> i visited in july but i also visited in september after the attack on benghazi. so i can speak to my own experience. you know, went secretary clinton said all of his senior leaders in the department are accountable and responsible for what happened at it certainly felt myself. ihop the remains of my former colleagues back after the attack in benghazi. had been in the middle east on a trip and cut short to come back with them. and all that long flight home i certainly have a lot of time to think about sharper questions that i could've asked, sharper focus that i could have provided. spent on your visit in july or september, did you -- >> july, yes. >> did that issue come up? did the folks on the ground say to you we are really worried about what's happening here with security? we've made a number of requests? >> there was no specific question about that. i did talk to ambassador stevens about the security situation but we didn't talk about specifics at the time. >> secretary clinton met with the prime minister in march with -- you know if t
. and then there are decisions made my leaders, some of which have changed the course of history, for better or for worse. july 4, 1776, the decision to declare independence. january, 1863, abraham's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolf hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use abatomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine the process of making a tough decision. we'll hear about major decisions on an international stage. about corporate decisions to personal ones. from taking down the most wanted man in the world. >> the president said i'm going to go with my decision. write up the orders .. >> to giving up a dream career. >> it was a sense of lm unreality, i'm not really sure i know who i am. >> to uprooting a company culture. >> some people actually quit. >> to opening the door to a closed society. >> this is like a spy thriller. >> each of my guests have wrestled with a difficult choice. they'll take us through their deliberations, their fears and how they made their tough decisions. >> at 11:00 a.m. on may 1, 2011, two b
to montgomery. on july 6, 1964, he led 50 african americans to the courthouse in selma, alabama, on voter registration day, but sheriff jim clark arrested them rather than allow them to apply to vote. i played for congressman lewis a clip of his close friend and ally, martin luther king jr., speaking in 1965 about jim clark. rev. martin luther king jr.: i am here to tell you tonight that the businessmen, the mayor of this city, the police commissioner of this city, and everybody in the white power structure of this city must take a responsibility for everything that jim clark does in this community. it's time for us to say to these men, that if you don't do something about it, we will have no alternative but to engage in broader and more drastic forms of civil disobedience in order to bring the attention of the nation to this whole issue in selma, alabama. amy goodman: dr. martin luther king. you were in the church, john lewis. rep. john lewis: it was an unbelievable speech. dr. king spoke out of his gut. sheriff clark was a very mean man. he was vicious. i think maybe he was a little sic
in this rain. >> i will even hide the book. [inaudible conversations] [laughter] >> julie. >> how are you? good to see you. how if web you been? >> i've been well. how about you? >> here i am. >> it's so good to see you. .. >> can i get a picture with you, to require? is one of those roaming errors. it's a brand-new day. okay, get in here. don hardy. >> this is one of my students. this is one of my finest students. he is of the face. >> i'm in the white house now. [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> that's how project sessions start. >> it's you, margaret. >> it's me, margaret. [inaudible] >> wow. >> his mother was judge alice k. birdie, big democrat with 13 children. i voice, for gross. >> i wish i could've been your author. >> used to take the whole staff over. >> my goodness. >> we are all here. >> you remember my wife, sir. >> good to see you off. [inaudible conversations] >> how are you doing? >> they have a copy yet. >> we were together at treasury, so they get together every once in a while and trade stories. [inaudible] >> the guy with the radio. [laughter] >> they don't know your
talked about this is a couple of years ago when we hit hit it in july and i was dead wrong. i was entirely dead wrong. i thought congress would make sure we wouldn't lose our aaa debt rate. >> and we did. >> and -- yeah. i figured certainly logically that yields would go up on bonds. and that the stock market would fall and just the opposite happening. what happen this time to the markets still have patience. you know, rinehart talk about that bang moment when countries are able to continue to issue really cheap debt for a long, long time. sounding like forever and boom. it stops. i don't think that will be this moment. but sooner or later, the world's financing capability and -- intentions and -- stop. >> what do you do right now? i think a lot of people who were watching don't understand necessarily what impact hitting the debt ceiling would necessarily mean to them or to the nation's finance. personally, i think there is a lot of pier mongering in washington and i don't think it is necessarily that big of a deal. what do you do with your finances right here? what are you in
fell this month to the lowest point since july. and wall street gave ground today on worries about the lack of a budget deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 121 points to close near 13,190. the nasdaq fell 29 points to close at 3,021. for the week, the dow gained about half a percent; the nasdaq rose 1.7%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we return to the aftermath of the shootings in newtown, connecticut, a week ago today. ray suarez begins our coverage of the latest developments. >> suarez: a cold rain fell this morning in newtown, connecticut, as townspeople and officials gathered at city hall for a moment of silence. at 9:30, a bell rang 26 times, once for each of the 20 children and six adults killed one week ago at sandy hook elementary school. mourners also gathered again at funerals and at makeshift memorials. >> i feel as though the first few days after this happened was really a feeling of numbness and shock. but now that's lifting a little bit and the reality is setting in, and it's very, very pain
. >> sitting at 21.29. >> a level we haven't seen since july when the market peaked so a few more people are throwing in the towel as we go into the weekend. >> a pity. so much focus on what people call it noise or headlines, whatever we want to say. we did get positive economic data today, didn't we, in the form of housing data and home sales data and the chick pmi and that's pretty much being ignored and everyone is focusing on what headlines come out of washington. we'll be back with the closing countdown. >> and i'll talk to one trader who has been one of the most positive on the floor expecting a resolution. we'll get his take now. also, after the bell health care stocks have had a pretty good year but what happens under obama care next yore? how to play that sector still ahead. you're washing cnbc, first in business worldwide. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf
"under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, dwight eisenhower proclaimed the fourth of july a national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, golfed in the afternoon, and played ridge in the evening. -- bridge in the evening. perhaps there were prayers in the us activities. -- these activities. this was not his first foray into the ground between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president-elect ike made a speech in which he said, quo"our form of government haso sense unless it is founded in the deeply fought religious space, and i do not care what it is your cu." he received much ridicule for the last part of his statement. for expressing indifference to the religion. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly, many americans, perhaps a majority of them, agree that democracy, at least our democracy, which is based on the belief in natural rights presupposes a religious faith. people who believe this, as eisenhower did, the declaration of independence, and the proposition tha
"under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, it he proclaimed the fourth of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, golfed in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which he said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. t
rockets on july 4 or maybe setting up another nuclear test around new year's. you know, we go through these cycles. we assume that one day we are going to get them back to the negotiating table, we try to do that, and then they turn around and they break their promise. we are right back where we started from. my point is that i think we should really stop thinking about what we can do to handle this situation. rather, we should accept that the north koreans control the table on this. heather: so do nothing? >> well, what can we do? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting
that came within my parameter. >> reporter: in july 1991 president george h.w. bush awarded schwarzkopf the presidential medal of freedom and last night the former president who is struggling with his own health crisis issued a statement saying "shwords cop of epitomized the duty service, country creed that has dchbed our freedom." schwarzkopf knew the value of peace, and the price of confrontation. >> the more you sweat in peace, the less you bleed in war. >> reporter: general norman schwarzkopf was 78 years old. for "cbs this morning," bob orr in washington. >> schwarzkopf's former boss is likely to be hospitalized for a while according to the top aide. the 41st president is in intensive care at houston's methodist hospital being treated for a persistent fever. this morning his condition remains guarded but mr. bush's chief of staff, jean becker says we should "put the harpz back in the closet" meaning he's sick but not that sick. >>> the powerful winter storm that caused trouble across the country is finally moving out, left parts of western new york and pennsyl
as a public service by your television provider. -- julie watches c-span on verizon. washington journal continues. host: joining us on indianapolis is doug wissing, author of "funding and the enemy." we are talking about afghanistan and the end game. first, the title of your book that you wrote this year, how u.s. taxpayers bankrolled the taliban, remind us of what you were right thing? -- were writing. guest: i am sorry. i'm getting feedback in my earphone. if you could come off my audio, thank you. when i was imbedded with u.s. soldiers in afghanistan, i began to realize that the soldiers were trying to explain to me that there was a toxics system that was connecting distracted american officials, -- i'm sorry, i'm back to getting this in my ear phone. host: we will see if they can fix it. if you can try to continue, we will try to fix it. guest: there was a toxic network, hearing myself twice simply does not work. there was a toxic network that was connecting distracted american officials, u.s. corporations, military- industrial and development and industrial complex corporations, co
for liberation who elected a pro-american government in july, who sought greater u.s. assistance to treat their wounded, train their national security forces come to secure their borders, build their democratic institutions, and expand the rule of law. libyans did not want al qaeda militias running amok in large parts of the country. that is the reality we now face. this is the broader failure of the administration's so-called life footprint approach toward libya. regardless of whom the president nominates to serve in his cabinet, we will continue to ask these questions and demand answers and accountability. i would like to concur with senator mccain. i thought the report was very detailed and the recommendations good and solid in terms of how to better understand the intelligence and run it, how to improve security on the ground, and there is much we can learn from this report. here is what we do know -- we know nothing about president obama before, during, and after the attack. they're making two movies about his use of in the bin laden rate, and he deserves that. it was well executed a
that this past july. beautiful experience. >> juliet: and what is your next climb going to be, young man? >> the next climb is january 12 to the 17. we're going up to mount washington to do ice climbing. >> kelly: oh, wow. >> juliet: i have to ask you, we sit here and we complain over our lives sometimes when we have everything and we are able-bodies, we've got our legs. what is it about you that makes you able to be so strong and have such a -- so brave and so positive? >> you know, i believe that i could have handled the situation either way. i could be absolutely miserable or i could be positive and try to help. just like i said before, i was given that second chance and it's kept me positive and all i want to do is be able to help out these families. >> kelly: keith, god bless you and thank you for your service to this country. >> juliet: yes, thank you. >> kelly: you make us all very proud and to donate no the special warriors foundation, go to what we're going to show you righto to our web site. you are a remarkable man. god bless you. >> juliet: let us know how it all goes. >> abs
from julie. why can't the government run the country the way i run my household? i pay my bills on time and i have a budget. that's a tweet. >> eric: stop being dems and republicans, citizens of one country. that's a fantastically accurate treat. it's both sides pointing the finger. kind of laughing, going back to the districts, they're all making their 175 grand a year, they're spending 124 days on vacation. the cadillac insurance policy. >> juliet: let's go to other headlines. russian president putin is trying to make a political point at the expense of orphans. just a short time ago, putin signed a bill that bans americans from adopting russian children. it's retaliation for a u.s. law cracking down on russian human rights violators here in the united states. one american family in the process of adopting is now left in limbo. >> these children are not available to international adoption until after they've been on a domestic registry for at least eight months. now, in our son's case, 22 families, russian families, came to see him and rejected him because of his blood line. >> juliet
back in 08 and was working in july, i think, he suffered cardiac arrhythmia and passed away at his desk. people watching closely remember mitt romney and jim messina tweeting condolences and the obama campaign shut down for the day when alex died. what was meaningful was it's unfathomable. he was of the age that swept obama into power. not politically silent, but somewhat motionless and actually came out in full force and helped create this identity and they were as much a part of it that they supported and it just seems profoundly unfair that he didn't make it to see at least the end of the 2012 election cycle. >> talk about the process of how newtown changed the complexion's content of the list. >> we added essentially a second cover to this issue. we use that to acknowledge the victims of newtown. to point out that this is a celebration of life. there is no way to express the horror and the that occurred in that tragedy. our decision to acknowledge newtown in a context that we gave it was simply the only meaning we can scribe to at this moment. we have meaning for decades and decades
depot's annual revenue comes for the quarter that ends in july, about the same for lowe's as well. those are two stocks to watch in today's decision. but the nrf guy also made a point of saying that containers are coming in, and there could be a backup that needs to be resolved. even if the situation is resolved in a matter of days, there are still going to be containers that are stacked and they've got to work through that backlog before they can take in new containers. so there will be a ripple effect. >>> let's bring in peter anderson, senior portfolio manager with congress manage asset. good to see you. >> thank you. >> at this point, what is the risk to the markets? risk to the upside or the downside if a deal is reached? >> well, i first have to tell you that strategically, i'm not really factoring that the whole fiscal cliff picture into a longer term portfolio strategy. i think it's very, very difficult to do that however, like everybody else, we are glued to the headlines to see how this thing is going to play out. butting that being said, i think the main important reason is th
be brought up, it would pass overwhelmingly, i repeat. any given day the past six months, since july 25th, speaker boehner could have the middle class tax cut legislation to vote in the house and it would pass. but he is doing -- made the decision he is not going to let a vote on that because if he let it be voted upon it would pass. i have said here, mr. president, it is not too late for the speaker to take up the senate-passed bill but that time is even winding down. today is thursday. he is going to give 48 hours' notice to the house before they come back. so, 48 hours from today is saturday. with just that one vote, middle class families would have the secure that their taxes wouldn't go up by at least $2200 on new year's day. that's the average. some would go up more, some less, of course. speaker boehner should call members to of the house back to washington today. he shouldn't have let them go, in fact. they're not here. they're not here. john boehner seems to care more about keeping his speakership than keeping the nation on firm financial footing it is obvious, mr. president, wha
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)